Tag Archives: Writers Resources

The Music of Our Words

14 Jul

 

What do you listen to when you write? Do you listen to music? Or to white noise? The sea or windchimes or birdsong? Or to nothing at all?

This morning mine is Tartanic (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2HMKpOYel4&feature=share&list=PL16EFDDBDFDFC7E2B) and Cast in Bronze (http://www.youtube.com/user/CarillonBellsMan)

Have you ever thought of changing up what you listen to? How would it change your writing? The tempo? The message?

This morning I’ve been playing around with music and creating my own mix to listen to over the next few weeks, and I’ve found that I can create in myself differnt moods even within my writing that kind of go along with what I’m listening to. I know it plays a role in how the words flow and how I lose myself in the writing, but I hadn’t realized that I can influence myself with what I’m listening to.

I’ve started taking one minute videos every (okay, almost every) day of something that strikes me. Some mornings it is the birds at sunrise, sometimes the cicadas at sunset. Others a moment caught when I’m out doing something with my family. I have my phone with me always and I capture moments in time that I think maybe I would like to be able to call back to mind easily later. I use these videos much like music on my iPod or on YouTube, to call a certain mood or frame of mind back to now.

How do you use the tools that you have at hand? How could you? I know in my life, I’m busy enough that I may not take the time at any given moment to capture the words that I maybe could capture but I capture a few words (sometimes on audio on my phone, sometimes as a note, sometimes just as a picture stolen in a second) and call back the memory later, when I have just a little more time.

There are shortcuts and tools all around us, what music can you capture today?  How can you make your words dance?

 

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Inspiration!

20 Jun

So, I’m always up for different ideas that I can use to tickle my inspiration.  Sometimes they end up taking me places I didn’t plan on going, sometimes they make me realize that there are some topics I just can’t chase very far.

I buy books, I hound websites, and I just start writing about random things.

One of my favorite trilogies is Your First 1,000 Days in Writerspark/ Your First 2,000 Days in Writerspark/ Your First 3,000 Days in Writerspark.  Three years’ worth of prompts in each book!  These books were based on a Yahoo Group “Writerspark”.

The fabulous news is, the moderator of the group is back and they are, once again, accepting new members!  This morning, I got a deluge of new prompts!  I’m avidly looking forward to prompts showing up in my email box every day!  I’m just as avidly looking forward to being able to stretch my edges and explore ideas I might not have been able to come up with on my own.

I’m wading through the new prompts, pulling them into my own PDF so I can take them with me on my tablet device and write when I have a few minutes to stretch.

How about you?  Where to you get ideas when you need to find new ways to exercise your writing muscles?  To come up with angles on things that are a little different than what you are used to?

This Yahoo group is supportive and will provide constructive critiques for writing samples if anyone wants to take a chance on it.

As for me, I’m going to venture forth and write about my desk!

Exercise #3740

The Desk

Compose a piece of no more than 750 words that shows the contents of a desktop in such a way that the images provide a sense of the person who uses the desk.

Bulls-eye: Knowing Your Target Audience

10 Jun

Hi, My name is April. I’m a writer who is guilty of writing without a target. I don’t know if you are guilty, too, but I’m guessing at least some people reading this are. I’ve almost always written because I’ve got something running around in my head that needs to escape. I guess I’ve always kind of assumed that whoever needed to read it would either find it or stumble on it accidentally.

DOH…

I was reading, this week, several different blog posts and a couple of book chapters, all of which reminded me what we were taught in high school English class… remember your reader… remember your target audience or your perfect reader. Picture your perfect reader, the one you are writing to and it will make the writing sound more like a story you are unwinding and less like you are spinning out of control.

As I read, this week, and worked through who I’m writing to this week, I connected better to myself and connected better to the story I am unwinding in my mind. I’ve decided on several projects that I need to work on and I know that I have different audiences for each one.

It is not to say that you write to what you think that audience wants, then all you are really doing is pumping out stories that don’t have the ring of authenticity. That isn’t any better than just taking off on your mind trip without any companion in mind. It is more to say that you want to have in your mind the person who you believe is sitting in the passenger seat of your automobile in your mind, the one you are traveling in as you unravel your tail.

How old are they, or how old do you think they are? The life experiences of a 45 – 55 year old are incredibly different from the life experiences of a twenty year old. How you tell your story is likely going to be different based on who you are talking to.

What is their education level and/or their socioeconomic background? It may well be that your story will fascinate people across the spectrum, but if you write for someone whose vocabulary is that of a neonatologist, you may find yourself losing the people who would treasure your stories if they had a more conversational vocabulary.

Where were they raised? You don’t have to know that they were raised in Intercourse, PA specifically to think that they are probably from a small to mid-sized town and will understand the reference of a small town and you can freely talk about dirt roads and sink holes where the ideal reader might not be from inner city LA necessarily if that is the language you write in. You can’t possibly hope to write for or make happy everyone from everywhere.

What are their core values?  Are you going to offend them if you swear?

This blog has a fascinating list of questions that can help you narrow down your target.  As a result of my thinking through who is in my adventure with me, sitting in the passenger seat of my peti-cab through the fertile fields of my imagination, I have a picture of my companion, and I am writing now for that person.  I really hope she likes the trip we are going on together.

The Wild Writer on the Move

8 Apr

Writing Forecast: It’s seventy degrees and sunny out, with a nice, cool breeze to occasionally ruffle my pages and remind me it’s spring. It’s the perfect day for writing outside.

Usually about once a week I run into the same problem: Where can I write that’s not too loud, but not too quiet; not too busy, but not too empty; not too cramped, but not too open? Many writers have a set time and place to write every day, and the system has its merits for sure. But often I find myself restlessly wandering about campus, searching for a place to write. No, not a place; the perfect place. After undergoing this process several times, here are some of the things I like to consider to ensure that the scenery fits the story.

Am I typing or handwriting?
There are few things I can think of that are more therapeutic that scribbling in a notebook outside on a warm, sunny day. But writing by hand on paper and typing on a laptop are two different beasts. Computers and nature rarely mix well, and fighting with the glare of the sun on your screen can become very frustrating very quickly. Even if you are handwriting, always, always check the forecast. Rain doesn’t agree with paper or technology, and if it’s breezy, be sure to safely secure your pages.

Do I know what I’m going to write?
If I already have some planning done on a piece, or even just a vague direction, I usually prefer someplace quiet like a library. Quiet, but never silent, as distractions can come from within your own head as much as they come from without. When freewriting or scouting for inspiration however, busy, bustling places are a gold mine of ideas. By watching people as they walk by and listening to what they say, you might just find something to spark your next big project.

Am I planning or revising?
Every writer I know has some kind of desk space personalized to fit their writing needs. (Mine is currently a cramped and cluttered desk tucked in the corner of a cramped and cluttered dorm room.) While I usually like to escape this cinder-block cell to someplace with the space for my thoughts, revision is the one stage where I absolutely must be at my desk. I need my laptop open amongst strewn about sticky notes and notebooks, with Strunk & White within easy reach. While my writing desk may not be where most of my projects begin, it is where all of them end.

It’s the perfect day for writing outside, and for now a bench in the shade will suffice (though the comfy-looking armchairs and background chatter of the student union building beckon me).

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